Frequently Asked Questions

Select your the state in which your charges occurred to view FAQs relevant to your case.

My charges are not showing through the free public data search. Does this mean my charges cannot be found?

No. Employers, landlords and anyone else looking for your charges can still find your criminal records through various other sources including background check companies or directly from the court in which your case was processed. Our system searches readily available public data to give you a free overview of your criminal record. However, when you purchase a Background Report Card, we will conduct a thorough search of your criminal history and find the charges of interest for you. In addition, we will tell you what you can do to clear each charge on your record!

What's an expunction?

An expunction means the Court seals and destroys all records of both the arrest and any court proceedings, so they can't ever be found by anyone. Any record of the expunction also gets destroyed. It's like the arrest (and the expunction) never happened.

What's a non-disclosure?

Non-disclosure requires all state and federal agencies to seal your record, so no one outside of the government can ever see it. The criminal record can be used against you in court for a future prosecution. But rest assured – law enforcement, jails, and the Department of Public Safety must seal your record and cannot disclose the offense to non-governmental agencies.

Do I qualify for an expunction or a non-disclosure?

In Texas, you can expunge an arrest as long as you didn't get convicted or receive some type of community supervision. You can also expunge a Class C Misdemeanor if you've completed deferred adjudication (probation, treatment, or community service). If you were convicted, received community supervision, or did not complete a deferred adjudication for a Class C Misdemeanor, you may still be able to get a non-disclosure.

Why should I get an expunction?

With an expunction, you don't have to tell employers, landlords, or police about your record. 80% of employers do background checks, and a criminal record reduces the likelihood you'll get called back or offered a job by nearly 50%. But an expunction means employers and others won’t see your criminal record. There’s just one exception: If you're being questioned under oath in court, you have to admit you were arrested and what for – but nothing more.

Why should I get a non-disclosure?

With a non-disclosure, the general public cannot find out what's on your record. All state and federal agencies that have any record of your offense must seal your record and cannot share any information on it with non-governmental entities. So, whether you're applying for a job, an apartment, or a loan, you can keep the details of your record completely private.

How long does an expunction or non-disclosure take?

It takes the State of Texas about 4-5 months to process a case. So, the sooner you begin the process, the sooner your name gets cleared.

What if I need to apply for a job before my record gets cleared?

We can provide you with documentation as proof for your employer, letting them know you're up for expunction or non-disclosure and your record should soon be cleared.

My charges are not showing through the free public data search. Does this mean my charges cannot be found?

No. Employers, landlords and anyone else looking for your charges can still find your criminal records through various other sources including background check companies or directly from the court in which your case was processed. Our system searches readily available public data to give you a free overview of your criminal record. However, when you purchase a Background Report Card, we will conduct a thorough search of your criminal history and find the charges of interest for you. In addition, we will tell you what you can do to clear each charge on your record!

What's an expunction?

In Indiana, an expunction, also referred to as an expungement, refers to restricting the use of criminal records. For most offenses, an expunction prohibits any public access to your record. For the more serious offenses, however, an expunction only prohibits any use of your record by anyone other than a prosecutor and only under special circumstances. In either case, an expunction is powerful tool for regaining control of your life.

Do I Qualify for an Expunction?

In Indiana, you may expunge both convictions and dismissals as long as certain criteria are met. While laws for expungement of non-convictions are relatively easier to navigate, laws regarding convictions can get quite tricky. Lucky for you, our system can determine your eligibility instantly when you purchase a Background Report Card.

Why should I get an expunction?

An expunction protects you from many of the negative consequences of having a criminal record. For example, with your record expunged, employers and landlords will no longer be able to reject you on grounds of your criminal record.

How long does an expunction take?

On average you can expect the process to take approximately four to six months; however, every case is different and the amount of time it takes for a court to process your case depends on many factors such as whether the DA objects. We want to hear about our customer's success, so we will continue to follow up with you after we provide your documents and will do our best to answer any questions you might have.

Will receiving an expunction also remove my record from the internet?

No, but it can be removed from the internet. Once your expunction order is granted, you must notify each of the hundreds of background check and mugshot companies individually to have them delete your information...or you can leave the job to us with the purchase a premium package!

What if I need to apply for a job before my record gets cleared?

We can provide you with documentation as proof for your employer, letting them know you're up for expunction and your record should soon be cleared.

What documents will I need in addition to the forms Easy Expunctions provides?

In addition to the forms provided by Easy Expunctions, you will need to gather the the following documentation required by the State of Indiana: 1.) Indiana State Police Limited Criminal History Report - Petitioners will need to request a "review challenge" by making an appointment to have their fingerprints taken electronically. 2.) A copy of your Indiana BMV Official Driver's Record - this document is not required when filing but it is important. Including this document can help reduce the amount of time it takes to process a petition because it contains a list of all the addresses where the petitioner has lived in Indiana; among other important information. 3.) Chronological Case Summary – Petitioners should request copies of all criminal records from the Clerk of the Circuit Court in the county where the conviction occurred. If you have questions about this, please let us know and we can share helpful instructions. 4.) State police criminal history report from any state where you have lived since the commission of your first offense – this is only required if you have lived outside of Indiana. 5.) State driving record for every state where you have lived since the commission of your first offense – this is only required if you have lived outside of Indiana.

What if I have multiple cases I want expunged?

If you have convictions in multiple counties you want expunged, you will have to file separate petitions in each county. All of these petitions must be filed within the same one-year window in order to be treated as a single petition, because the law only allows a single expungement in a person's lifetime. We offer a discount when you sign up to expunge multiple cases.

Where should I file my petition for expungement?

When seeking to expunge conviction records your petition must be filed in the sentencing court. If you are applying for an expungement of arrest records your petition should be filed in the court where charges were brought, or if no charges were filed, in the court that has jurisdiction in the county where the arrest occurred. We will provide you detailed instructions on where to take your documents and answer any questions you have about the process of filing your petition, but we will not file your documents for you.

Why would a court deny a request for expungement?

Cases get denied for many reasons such as: inaccuracies in the application or court files, additional charges pending against the petitioner, or the required waiting period to become eligible has not passed. Our technology is designed to indicate if one of these issues could affect your petition because we want all petitioners to be successful. If your petition is denied, you will be required to wait 3 years before petitioning for expungement again. If you use the documents we provide, and the court denies your petition for expungement we stand behind our 100% Money Back Guarantee and you would be eligible for a refund of any money you paid to us or to the court in filing fees. If you have reservations about representing yourself you should consider hiring an attorney licensed to practice in your jurisdiction.

What happens after my case is expunged?

The presiding judge will provide you with a signed court order instructing the Department of Corrections, the Bureau of Motor Vehicles, each law enforcement agency, and other relevant public entities not to disclose the records to anyone without a court order. The court's order will also seal any court records relating to the allegation that the conviction was based on.

Do I ever have to disclose my record?

You do not have to disclose the case and can respond to any inquiry or on any employment application that you have not been arrested or convicted of any case that has been expunged. The case shall be treated for all purposes as if you had not been arrested or convicted.

Will expunging my criminal record restore my right to own a firearm?

No. There is a separate process that must be followed in order to restore firearm rights and we do not currently offer a product addressing the restoration of the right to own a firearm.

Will my record still show up on my background check?

Usually no, however, this will ultimately depend on the level of the offense and whether you were convicted.

How do the agencies know the expungement was granted?

The court will send the signed order to all the entities referenced in your petition that are in possession of records from the expunged case(s). The signed order granting the expunction requires the named entities to seal the records from the expunged case(s).

How long do records take to be updated?

Government agencies typically take 30-60 days to update their records.

My charges are not showing through the free public data search. Does this mean my charges cannot be found?

No. Employers, landlords and anyone else looking for your charges can still find your criminal records through various other sources including background check companies or directly from the court in which your case was processed. Our system searches readily available public data to give you a free overview of your criminal record. However, when you purchase a Background Report Card, we will conduct a thorough search of your criminal history and find the charges of interest for you. In addition, we will tell you what you can do to clear each charge on your record!

What's an expunction?

An expunction means the Court seals and destroys all records of both the arrest and any court proceedings, so they can't ever be found by anyone. Any record of the expunction also gets destroyed. It's like the arrest (and the expunction) never happened.

Do I Qualify for an Expunction?

In North Carolina, you may expunge both convictions and dismissals, as long as certain criteria are met. While laws for expungement of dismissals are generally easier to navigate, laws regarding convictions can get quite tricky.

Why should I get an expunction?

An expunction is a powerful tool that can restore your opportunities with respect to employment, housing, education, and even financing. Once you have your record expunged, it will no longer be available for public access, and you may deny it ever happening.

How long does an expunction take?

It can take the State of North Carolina over a year to process a case. So, the sooner you begin the process, the sooner your name gets cleared!

Will receiving an expunction also remove my record from the internet?

No, but it can be removed from the internet. Once your order is granted, you must notify each of the hundreds of background check and mugshot companies individually to have them delete your information...or you can leave the job to us with the purchase of a premium package!

What if I need to apply for a job before my record gets cleared?

We can provide you with documentation as proof for your employer, letting them know you're up for expunction and your record should soon be cleared.

How do the agencies know the expungement was granted?

The court will send the signed order to all the entities referenced in your petition that are in possession of records from the expunged case(s). The signed order granting the expunction requires the named entities to seal the records from the expunged case(s).

My charges are not showing through the free public data search. Does this mean my charges cannot be found?

No. Employers, landlords and anyone else looking for your charges can still find your criminal records through various other sources including background check companies or directly from the court in which your case was processed. Our system searches readily available public data to give you a free overview of your criminal record. However, when you purchase a Background Report Card, we will conduct a thorough search of your criminal history and find the charges of interest for you. In addition, we will tell you what you can do to clear each charge on your record!

What's an expunction?

When you receive an expunction, also referred to an expungement, your criminal history information will be deleted from the central repository of criminal history information maintained by the Washington State Patrol. As a result, your criminal record information will no longer be available for dissemination.

What's a conviction vacation?

When you have your conviction vacated, your charge will be marked as vacated and information about your charge may no longer be disseminated or disclosed by the Washington State Patrol to anyone except other legal enforcement agencies. In addition, you may state that you were never convicted of that crime.

Why should I get my record expunged or conviction vacated?

Having your record expunged or conviction vacated protects you from many of the negative consequences of having a criminal record. For example, with your record expunged or conviction vacated, employers and landlords will no longer be able to reject you based on your criminal record.

Do I qualify for an expunction or conviction vacation?

In Washington, you can only expunge arrest record that resulted in a non-conviction or were never resolved. For convictions, on the other hand, your only option is to have the conviction vacated.

Will having my record expunged or conviction vacated also remove my criminal record information from the internet?

No, but it can be removed from the internet. Once your order is granted, you must notify each of the hundreds of background check and mugshot companies individually to have them delete your information...or you can leave the job to us with the purchase of a premium package!

What if I need to apply for a job before my record gets cleared?

We can provide you with documentation as proof for your employer, letting them know you're up for expunction and your record should soon be cleared.

My charges are not showing through the free public data search. Does this mean my charges cannot be found?

No. Employers, landlords and anyone else looking for your charges can still find your criminal records through various other sources including background check companies or directly from the court in which your case was processed. Our system searches readily available public data to give you a free overview of your criminal record. However, when you purchase a Background Report Card, we will conduct a thorough search of your criminal history and find the charges of interest for you. In addition, we will tell you what you can do to clear each charge on your record!

What does sealing my record accomplish?

Records held by courts, jails, law enforcement and other criminal justice agencies will no longer be accessible to the general public. An order granting a petition to seal records will usually cover information concerning the petitioner's arrest, detention, trial, disposition, and treatment as well as other documents pertaining to the charges that are being sealed. While the records will not completely disappear, public agencies will normally have to get a court order or be authorized by statute in order to access the sealed records.

How long will it take to seal my record?

It will take at least three months from the time you file your petition for your information to no longer show up on public background checks. Hearings are usually held about six weeks after the court receives your petition. Assuming the court grants your petition at the hearing, it will take at least another six weeks for the different agencies that maintain criminal record information to update the records.

Will I have to go to a hearing?

Hopefully not! It is rare for an objection to be filed by the prosecutor or other law enforcement agency, but it can happen. If any objections are raised, a hearing will be set. Objections are more likely if you are requesting that a serious charge be sealed or if you have an extensive criminal history. Regardless, if a hearing is set you will have the opportunity to explain to the court why granting your petition would be in the best interests of justice.

I accepted a plea deal after being charged with a felony. I pled guilty to a misdemeanor, received probation for the misdemeanor then got a deferred judgement and sentence for the felony charge. The felony was dismissed after I completed the deferred judgement. Can I get the felony charge sealed?

You can have the felony sealed once ten years have passed, so long as you have not had any new criminal charges from the time of the dismissal until the point you file your petition to seal the felony charge.

What steps need to be taken to seal my record?

1.) You will need to get a copy of your criminal records from the police department. 2.) Get a current verified copy of your criminal record history from the Colorado Bureau of Investigations. 3.) Complete the applicable forms. 4.) File the petition in the court where the original case was heard. Once your petition has been received, the court will review it and decide whether to schedule a hearing. If the judge orders your records sealed, you will need to send the signed order to any relevant agencies holding your records.

What do I do if an agency ignores the Sealing Order?

Agencies must follow orders from the court, so if they fail to remove a charge, this is a violation of the court's orders. You should immediately send a follow up order from the court to the agency, as well as contact the agency. If this does not result in the sealing of the charge, you should contact an attorney to discuss your rights under the law. Since we do not represent you, we cannot contact an agency on your behalf or bring suit to enforce the court order.

What do I do if my petition to seal my record is denied?

It is rare for a judge to deny a petition when all the statutory elements are met, however, a record seal is never guaranteed because the judge has discretion on whether or not to grant the petition. If the judge denies your petition you may choose to hire an attorney to appeal the denial or you can wait twelve months and file a new petition to seal your record. If you want to hire an attorney to appeal the court's decision you should take immediate action because there are time constraints on when you can file an appeal. You can also purchase our Easy Eraser package which will clear your private information and criminal record from some of the leading people search sites on the internet to make it more difficult for the public to find information you want to keep from being disclosed.

After my record is sealed can I deny having ever been arrested during a job interview?

Yes, except for in a few rare circumstances such as when applying to become a lawyer with the Colorado Bar.

My charges are not showing through the free public data search. Does this mean my charges cannot be found?

No. Employers, landlords and anyone else looking for your charges can still find your criminal records through various other sources including background check companies or directly from the court in which your case was processed. Our system searches readily available public data to give you a free overview of your criminal record. However, when you purchase a Background Report Card, we will conduct a thorough search of your criminal history and find the charges of interest for you. In addition, we will tell you what you can do to clear each charge on your record!

What is the effect of an expungement in New Jersey?

When a judge grants your petition for expungement, law enforcement will be ordered to keep your criminal record private; however, the record will not be destroyed. You will be able to deny the offense ever occurred when dealing with the general public, but there are certain limited circumstances when your expunged record can be used by governmental agencies if you are involved in any criminal proceedings in the future. Additionally, there are some governmental agencies that are exempt from the expungement order, such as the Real Estate Commission and the Department of Insurance, who cannot be compelled by the court to update their records.

Will I be able to deny the offense occurred when applying for jobs?

In most circumstances, yes, but there are some exceptions. For example, if you are applying for a job with a law enforcement agency you would have to reveal the existence of the expunged offense.

Can I expunge a driving offense?

Not at this time. Motor vehicle convictions are generally not considered criminal convictions, but instead are treated as violations of the motor vehicle code and can therefore not be expunged. This includes charges of driving under the influence.

I was convicted of an indictable offense, can I expunge my record?

If your only conviction consists of a single indictable offense and you have not been convicted of two or more disorderly or petty disorderly offenses, you may file a petition for expungement in the county where your conviction occurred. You may also petition to expunge up to two disorderly or petty disorderly offenses. In most circumstances, you will have to wait 10 years from the time you were convicted, completed probation or were released from jail (whichever is later) before filing your petition. If you commit any disorderly/petty disorderly offenses in the interim, the court may believe you have not been rehabilitated and deny your petition. In certain circumstances, the ten-year waiting period can be reduced to five years if the court finds the expungement is in the public interest. If you have been convicted of two or more indictable offenses in New Jersey or in any other state, those offenses are not, and will not become, eligible for expungement.

What is an indictable offense versus a disorderly offense?

Generally speaking, an indictable offense is one that is punishable by six or more months of jail, even if the judge does not impose a six-month sentence. If the offense is punishable by at least a six-month jail sentence, it is considered an indictable offense. A disorderly offense is generally punishable with a jail sentence of less than six months, or is a violation of a municipal ordinance. A good rule of thumb is that if your case was heard in Superior Court it was probably an indictable offense, while if your case was heard in Municipal Court it was most likely a disorderly offense or a municipal ordinance violation.

I completed the terms and rehabilitation required by the drug court, can I expunge those records?

Generally no, however there are some major exceptions for distributing marijuana (less than 25 grams) or hashish (less than five grams), as well as if you were charged with a third or fourth degree offense and the court believes it would be in the public interest. Additionally, if you were under 21 at the time you were convicted of a controlled substance offense, you might be able to have the conviction expunged if: 1.) You did not violate any conditions of your probation or parole. 2.) You have not had any subsequent convictions. 3.) You have not had any other offenses dismissed.

I have multiple disorderly offenses, may I get them expunged?

Generally yes. You may expunge up to three disorderly offenses if you have never been convicted of an indictable offense. There is a waiting period of five years from the time you were released from jail, completed probation, were convicted, or paid your fine (whichever is later) before you can apply. Sometimes the required five year waiting period can be reduced to three years if the court believes the expungement would in the public interest.

Can I expunge a municipal ordinance violation?

Yes, except if you were convicted of a prior or subsequent indictable offense or if you were convicted of two or more disorderly offenses on more than two different occasions.

I have multiple indictable offenses all occurring from the same time. Can I get all of the offenses expunged?

Yes, if your convictions all have the same offense date, and if the court views all your convictions as stemming from the same criminal act, the court may consider the crimes to be one offense and can treat it as a such.

Why should I expunge my arrest record if I wasn't convicted?

Arrest records can often cause the same problems as records of a conviction, so it is important to get them cleared from your record. Best of all there is no fee to expunge your arrest record! In most cases, arrest records can be cleared unless the charge was dismissed as part of a plea agreement where you agreed to take a conviction on other charges. If you have a charge dismissed as part of a plea agreement, the conviction must be expunged first, before you seek to expunge other charges in the arrest record. You also cannot expunge an arrest record if you were found not guilty by reason of insanity.

My charges were dismissed after I completed a treatment program; can I have the arrest expunged?

Yes. Charges dismissed after completion of a supervisory treatment program may be expunged six months after the order of dismissal is issued.

Why is the prosecutor objecting to my expungement petition?

Prosecutors may object if they believe that you do not meet the statutory requirements or if they believe the need for your record to remain public outweighs the disadvantages it causes you. You should be willing and able to explain to the court why you believe it is in the best interests of justice and the general public that your record be expunged. If there is a minor problem with your petition that the prosecutor has an objection to, you should be given the chance to file an amended petition.

I have pending charges; can I file for an expungement?

Unfortunately no. When filing your petition, you must certify that you have no pending charges and that you have never been granted an expungement of an indictable offense before.

How long does the process take?

You should expect the process to take a minimum of 60 days from the time you file your petition, and potentially longer. The process depends on several factors, such as the case load of the court, whether a hearing is required, or if there is an objection.

What are the filing fees?

If you are seeking to expunge a conviction, there is a $75 filing fee to be paid to the court. This fee must be paid in the form of a cashier's check or money order.

Do I have to disclose my out of state criminal record?

Yes. All out of state arrests and convictions must be disclosed when petitioning for an expungement in New Jersey.

Why do I have a criminal history record even though the charges against me were dismissed?

A criminal history record is created whenever a person is arrested and fingerprinted even if charges are dismissed or dropped later. In general, this record will remain public unless it is sealed or expunged.

What is the difference between sealing and expungement?

Both sealing and expungement result in the general public no longer having access to the criminal history record. Expunged records are destroyed except for one copy retained by the Department of Law Enforcement and by the court. Sealed Records are available only to the subject of the record or the subject’s attorney. However, sealed and expunged records can also be accessed by a limited number of government entities for licensing and employment purposes, including law enforcement, and agencies serving vulnerable populations such as children, the disabled, and schools.

What entities will still have access to my sealed record?

Florida criminal justice agencies, the Florida Bar, Department of Children and Families, the Department of Education (including but not limited to the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation), the Agency for Health Care Administration, the Agency for Persons with Disabilities, the Department of Health, the Department of Elderly Affairs, the Department of Juvenile Justice, the Department of Financial Services (including the Division of Insurance Agent and Agency Services), and the Bureau of License Issuance of the Division of Licensing within the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. Even though these entities will be able to get access to your record the record will include a notation that the criminal history information has been sealed.

How many arrests can I have sealed or expunged?

Florida law currently only allows the criminal history record from a single arrest be sealed or expunged. However, if a court decides that multiple arrests are directly related the court has the power to order the criminal history record from the related arrests be sealed or expunged.

Do I have to have an attorney to get my criminal history sealed or expunged?

There is no requirement that you have an attorney in order to request a seal or an expungement of your criminal history record. However, because the process sometimes involves complex legal issues, an attorney’s advice and assistance may well be helpful in many cases. If you need information on how to contact an attorney that is knowledgeable in this area of the law, you can contact the Florida Bar online at http://www.floridabar.org or by phone at (800) 342-8011.

I received a pardon, can I have my criminal history sealed or expunged?

No, unless the pardon states otherwise. See R.J.L. v. State, 887 So.2d 1268 (Fla. 2004).

I received clemency, will my record be automatically expunged?

No, clemency will not automatically expunge your criminal record.

If I have my civil rights restored, will my criminal history be expunged?

No because you will still have a felony conviction on your record even if your civil rights are restored.

I had a record sealed or expunged in a different state am I still be eligible to have a criminal history sealed or expunged in the State of Florida?

Yes, having a record sealed or expunged outside of Florida will not disqualify you from having your Florida criminal history record sealed or expunged.

How long does it take for the FDLE to process an Application for a Certificate of Eligibility?

It can take up to 6 months, or longer if you submit an incomplete application, for the FDLE to process an Application for a Certificate of Eligibility. By visiting http://www.fdle.state.fl.us/Seal-and-Expunge-Process/Seal-and-Expunge-Home.aspx you can see the current month’s applications that are being processed.

Who provides notice of the order to seal or expunge a criminal history record?

The Clerk of the Court is responsible for sending certified copies of the court order to the State Attorney’s Office and the arresting agency. The arresting agency is then responsible for sending a certified copy of the court order to all agencies that the arresting agency disseminated the criminal history information to, such as the FDLE, the Department of Corrections, and the Department of Juvenile Justice.

If I have had my record sealed or expunged but my record is still showing up on the internet, what can I do?

A seal or expungement order only restricts access to your record at the government level. In order to remove the information from the internet you will need to contact all the private entities displaying your information to request they remove it. Easy Expunctions offers the Eliminator service which notifies hundreds of online background check, people search, and data brokers of the need to remove the sealed or expunged criminal history information from their records.

What are my rights after having my criminal history record sealed or expunged?

After a court has ordered your criminal history record sealed or expunged you may lawfully deny the record, however there are exceptions to this general rule, including when seeking approval for firearms purchases or transfers.

What offenses can be sealed?

Sealing is available in cases where there has been no adjudication of guilt, as well as in cases where adjudication has been withheld – except that certain serious sexual and violent offenses are not eligible for sealing in withheld cases. 

What offenses can be expunged?

Expungement is possible when no charges were filed or all the charges from an arrest were dismissed prior to trial. In the case of deferred judgments, if the record has been sealed for 10 years it is eligible to be expunged. 

How much will it cost to seal or expunge my criminal history record?

There are several costs associated with getting your record sealed or expunged. First, there are costs associated with the Application for a Certificate of Eligibility, these include the cost of a notary, postage, and the $75 application fee. There are also costs associated with getting a certified case disposition but we will take care of that for you so you don’t have to worry about that. The statutory fee associated with the actual filing of your petition is $42, however many counties charges additional amounts for copying and certification, which will vary by county. In our experience, the total fees paid to the court/clerk when filing your petition should not exceed $100. If you are unable to pay your court filing fees you may be able to request a payment plan from the clerk at the time you file.

Will I have to attend a hearing?

It is up to the particular court where your petition is filed whether to have a hearing or not. Some judges prefer to grant petitions without a hearing while others may wish to have a hearing before issuing a ruling.

What charges can be sealed?

The offenses which may not be sealed (or expunged even if previously sealed for 10 years) are: (a) Sexual misconduct, as defined in s. 393.135, s. 3457 394.4593, or s. 916.1075; (b) Illegal use of explosives, as defined in chapter 552; (c) Terrorism, as defined in s. 775.30; (d) Murder, as defined in s. 782.04, s. 782.065, or s. 782.09; (e) Manslaughter or homicide, as defined in s. 782.07, s. 3463 782.071, or s. 782.072; (f) Assault or battery, as defined in ss. 784.011 and 784.03, respectively, of one family or household member by another family or household member, as defined in s. 741.28(3); (g) Aggravated assault, as defined in s. 784.021; (h) Felony battery, domestic battery by strangulation, or aggravated battery, as defined in s. 784.03, s. 784.041, and s. 784.045, respectively; (i) Stalking or aggravated stalking, as defined in s. 784.048; (j) Luring or enticing a child, as defined in s. 787.025; (k) Human trafficking, as defined in s. 787.06; (l) Kidnapping or false imprisonment, as defined in s. 787.01 or s. 787.02; (m) Any offense defined in chapter 794; (n) Procuring a person less than 18 years of age for prostitution, as defined in former s. 796.03; (o) Lewd or lascivious offenses committed upon or in the presence of persons less than 16 years of age, as defined in s. 800.04; (p) Arson, as defined in s. 806.01; (q) Burglary of a dwelling, as defined in s. 810.02; (r) Voyeurism or video voyeurism, as defined in s. 810.14 and s. 810.145, respectively; (s) Robbery or robbery by sudden snatching, as defined in s. 812.13 and s. 812.131, respectively; (t) Carjacking, as defined in s. 812.133; (u) Home-invasion robbery, as defined in s. 812.135; (v) A violation of the Florida Communications Fraud Act, as provided in s. 817.034; (w) Abuse of an elderly person or disabled adult, or aggravated abuse of an elderly person or disabled adult, as defined in s. 825.102; (x) Lewd or lascivious offenses committed upon or in the presence of an elderly person or disabled person, as defined in s. 825.1025; (y) Child abuse or aggravated child abuse, as defined in s. 827.03; (z) Sexual performance by a child, as defined in s. 827.071; (aa) Any offense defined in chapter 839; (bb) Certain acts in connection with obscenity, as defined in s. 847.0133; (cc) Any offense defined in s. 847.0135; (dd) Selling or buying of minors, as defined in s. 847.0145; (ee) Aircraft piracy, as defined in s. 860.16; (ff) Manufacturing a controlled substance in violation of chapter 893; (gg) Drug trafficking, as defined in s. 893.135; or (hh) Any violation specified as a predicate offense for registration as a sexual predator pursuant to s. 775.21, or sexual offender pursuant to s. 943.0435, without regard to whether that offense alone is sufficient to require such registration.

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